Category Archives: Frugality

Mondays With Millie: Probiotics in Your Diet- Yogurt

Yogurt Topped with Cashews and Coconut

Have you seen the commercials sharing how eating (a certain brand) of yogurt can improve your digestive health?

It’s true, yogurt is a great way to add probiotics, enzymes and beneficial bacteria to your diet. Unfortunately, most commercial yogurts also add heavy doses of  ingredients that you may be trying to avoid on your real food journey.  Overly processed and GMO laden, high fructose corn syrup is often the sweetener used in flavored yogurts.  Preservatives and natural flavorings, that probably are not as natural as you think, are also common in commercial flavored yogurts.  Plus the fact that it is extremely difficult to find a full-fat flavored yogurt and the low fat products are often made with the addition of powdered milk which is high in oxidized cholesterol which can cause heart disease and cancer.

Continue reading

Mondays with Millie: Cut out the Junk!

 

A photo of moneyFor the last several weeks we have been breaking down how to Transition to Real Food in 8 Easy Steps.  We have reached step 8, Cut out the Junk!  Truthfully, this could be much higher on the list.

By cutting out the ‘junk’ currently included in your food purchases you can not only improve your health but also free up a portion of your budget to afford higher quality ingredients.

Continue reading

Mondays With Millie: Let’s Talk About Produce

Fresh broccoli, red pepper and celery on a cutting boardFor the last several weeks we have been discussing how to transition to real food in 8 easy steps. We are on the home stretch and up to step 7 which is all about produce.

I believe that many times when people begin thinking about improving their diet, buying organic produce is one of the steps that immediately comes to mind. In fact, probably buying organic anything comes to mind. Even regular grocery stores often have a large selection of organic crackers, cereals and some organic produce.  Organic is a huge buzz word and a huge money maker for manufacturers.

Continue reading

Real Food Doesn’t Have to Break the Bank– Here’s Help!

Something I hear often when the discussion of eating  a diet based on real or whole foods is the high cost involved. In fact, I used to think that real food would be waaaay to expensive for my family’s modest budget.  But we found with a little creativity that we were able to transition to real foods while remaining on our Standard American Diet (SAD) budget.

A real food diet does not have to break the bank!

Continue reading

Upcoming Review Series: GNOWFGLINS eCourses

Howdy Folks!

photo of wardeh harmonSome of you are already familiar with the fantastic ecourse series offered by Wardeh Harmon of GNOWFGLINS (g-NOWF-glinz.) However, I bet not all of you have taken the leap and purchased a subscription to them.

Perhaps you’re uncertain if it’s worth the cost of enrollment (which is a very reasonable $10/month for the entry level,) or are inherently skeptical of online courses. I fall into both camps myself; however, people I know and respect have said wonderful things about Wardeh’s ecourses. Thus far, they’ve been 100% right!

Continue reading

Edible Weeds

oxalis - an edible wild plantIf you have ever taken a wilderness survival or wild edibles course, no doubt your eyes have already been opened as to the plethora of freely available, wild edibles right at your feet – often, right in your own yard!

In addition to being incredibly frugal, eating wild plants is healthy, sustainable, and finding them can be a lot of fun, harking back to our hunter-gatherer roots. As with all things in the wild, we have to be certain we have the requisite knowledge to safely partake in this activity, however.

How do I know if a wild plant is safe to eat?

Remember, some plants are poisonous – even deadly in small amounts. We have to be careful of what we eat when its identity is uncertain. Some safe plants have close relatives which look nearly identical to the untrained eye, but are toxic to humans. For this reason, we need to be pretty darned sure we’re eating what we think we’re eating!

Too, some “safe” plants are only safe when cooked, or only have certain parts which are safe, while other parts of the same plant may be toxic. It’s always a good idea to do research before embarking upon a wild edible plant gathering trip.

Here’s how to verify the identity of your plant:

ingham county logo1.) Unless you are absolutely certain you have successfully identified a given plant, you should bring in some additional help. Nearly every county in the U.S. has an Extension Office. What’s an Extension Office? It’s a source of (often free) advice, troubleshooting, and plant identification, among many other things. In our county, it is an extension of Michigan State University, which is widely known for its agricultural expertise.

These offices are generally grant-based, and are staffed with people who really want to help others. I call ours often! They will be happy to help you identify a given plant, and there are some things you can do to help them help you: 1.)Bring in the entire plant, including any flowers, berries, roots, and foliage. If that’s not possible, many offices will attempt to identify a plant from a clear photograph or small sample. 2.) Make notes about its habitat, including sun/shade, soil conditions, and the other plants you see around it.

2.) If visiting an Extension Office is not possible, there are a wide variety of field guides available to help you identify your mystery plant. We recommend the following:

A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants: Eastern and central North America (Peterson Field Guides) [Paperback] – A timeless classic from the master field guide, Roger Tory Peterson.

 

Nature’s Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants [Paperback] – This comprehensive book covers not only identification and collection, but also preparation of the plants

 

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods From Dirt To Plate (The Wild Food Adventure Series, Book 1) [Paperback] – An excellent resource from a renowned wild edibles expert, also covering everything from identification to preparation.

 

3.) Use our friend, The Googles. Searching for “Wild edible plants” yields a veritable plethora of information, including photos, videos, recipes, and more. As always, when taking advice from The Internet at Large, use good judgment – only take advice from credible resources. I prefer using college and university websites, or established scientists and researchers in the field, with a few ad hoc experts thrown in for good measure.

Finally, when in doubt, don’t eat it!

If you cannot establish the identity of your mystery plant, be safe rather than sorry. If you can preserve the plant for future identification, awesome. If not, take a photo or sketch if possible. Those berries may look delicious, but are they worth a horrible bout of diarrhea, or worse?

If you’re in the wilderness and your survival literally depends upon finding wild edibles, you can always perform the very meticulous and very time-intensive Universal Edibility Test.

mayapple - an edible wild plant

Which plants have you eaten personally, and where are they found?

It’s been many years since I’ve taken any wilderness survival courses, so these days, I stick to the most basic stuff. However, back in the day, these found their way onto my plate:

Paul Wheaton (renowned creator of Permies.com) has several videos online covering the preparation and eating of stinging nettles.

dandelion - an edible wild plantMost of these are easily identifiable, and are abundant in Michigan; in fact, they are plentiful right in our own yard. Last year, I pitched more weeds than I ate, but this year I’m determined to do better. We have heaping tons of lamb’s quarters in our garden – why not make it into a salad green? We have a preponderance of dandelions in the yard, and last year I made salads and a sweet syrup from them – this year, I plan to do the same. Sadly, we don’t have much clover, but after it feeds the bees, it will feed us, too.

The photo below is the atrocious state of weeds in our garden last summer – things were out of hand. Thinking about how I either threw them onto the compost pile or just let them go is disheartening right now, but last year was truly horrible for gardening, and I largely gave up midway through for a variety of reasons. A lot of what you’re seeing below are sorrels and lamb’s quarters – totally edible!

a garden overgrown with edible weeds

Legalities of harvesting wild plants

Some wild plants are protected under the law – this means you cannot legally harvest them for food or for any other purpose. This link lists endangered plants in Michigan, and here’s a handy tool to search your area within the United States. Additionally, harvesting on public lands is often prohibited by local or state ordinance, so check all appropriate rules before you have a conversation with a Department of Natural Resources officer who catches you in the act.  “Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints” is excellent advice when visiting public lands – don’t be a jerk!

If harvesting on private property, be sure you have the permission of the landowner; otherwise, you’re trespassing, and could be in violation of other laws, as well. If you’re harvesting common weeds, check with your friends and neighbors to see if they would allow you to harvest their weeds, thus saving them some work! Be sure to ask whether they have been sprayed with pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizer before you consume them.

Wild Medicinals

We’ll have a post in the future about using wild plants as medicinals/remedies, with expertise from a guest poster. There’s a whole medicine cabinet, likely right outside your window.

Mushrooms

chanterelle mushroomsHunting mushrooms is a science unto itself, and requires even more expertise than simply finding edible weeds. Some mushrooms are absolutely deadly, and have lookalike edible kin. I can’t offer any advice on mushrooming myself, but there are many resources out there; I recommend taking an in-person class which includes field trips. An important part of mushrooming is paying attention to habitat, and noticing subtle visual cues between species. Having an expert walk you through personally is invaluable. Right now, the only mushrooms I know I can identify are morels and chanterelles.

 Wrapping it all up

Wild edible plants are a free source of culinary delight and great nutrition, provided we research our species carefully, prepare them properly (if required,) and harvest them legally and sustainably.

I’d love to hear your tales of using wild edibles, from common back yard weeds to elegant and hard-to-find mushrooms – do tell!